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Amglish/English

Amglish/English category provides technical posts, articles, notes on anything that is related to human languages of English and Amglish.  Help spread the term Amglish to distinguish between the language spoken in United Kingdom and the language spoken in United States Of America.  Be early users of the word Amglish and be one of the pioneers of it's spread.   In many of the language articles of this site, the word "English" will be used to reference both Amglish of USA, and English of UK, and English dialects of other places.

Sub-categories will exist under this category, and will need to be explored. This is a new category for Tech Notes and will be grown slowly.  Feel free to provide your positive feedback and suggestions.

 


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Say IPA.  IP Does NOT Mean IP Address.

Usage of IP to incorrectly refer to IP Address has spread like a virus and people ignorantly use just IP due to not understanding that IP stands for Internet Protocol and probably also due to being lazy.   There are many, many other protocols, and IP is just one of them. It is incorrect usage to use IP to represent IP Address.  So, please do not refer to IP Address as just IP and if the environment allows when others use it incorrectly, then correct them.  Also, typically, when people say IPA, they are referring to IPv4 and not IPv6 address.

Please note that I do not get paid for these articles.

You are most likely looking for IPv4 IPAes, and those would be something like this format 192.168.54.55 and 192.186.121.101 addresses.  IP Addresses should not be confused with Machine/Physical Addresses (MACs).  An IPv6 format IPA would be something like 2001:470:6a2d:1:713e:dd8a:93c9:5143

 

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How To Quickly Choose Who Or Whom And Whoever Or Whomever In A Sentence.

Many people, including myself, get confused on choosing from the words who and whom for sentences.  I won't get into all the background information, Subject, Object, Tense, Verb, etc. relations and simply jump into an easy way to decide which to use.

This is what helps me, and I put it here to reference when I need it and for others to use too.

The following is for Amglish (USA language), and probably for English too.

Please note that I do not get paid to write these articles.  This is a best effort article.  If errors found, then please let me know.

What To Do For Who Or Whom Usage Selection

  1. Mentally start your sentence with WHO/WHOM.
  2. Then mentally replace the WHO/WHOM with the appropriate word of either HE/SHE or HIM/HER.
  3. Determine which works for the sentence and use it.  If the sentence makes sense with the words of either HE or SHE, then the answer is to use WHO.  If the sentence makes sense only with the substitution of HIM or HER, then the answer is to use WHOM.

 

Example 1:

  1. Barrack Obama, who/whom is the 44th President of the United States Of America, was a Congressman previously.
  2. "Him is the 44th President ....." does not work.  "He is the 44th President ....." makes sense, and thus WHO should be used.
  3. Barrack Obama, who is the 44th President of the United States Of America, was a Congressman previously.

 

Example 2:

The following example is more complicated because it is not obvious at first glance where to put the HE/SHE or HIM/SHE.  When a she or an he follows WHO/WHOM in your sentence, then you need to put the replacement test HE/SHE and HIM/HER after the verb that follows the already existing she or he in your sentence.  Obviously replacing the WHO/WHOM with a SHE/HE or HIM/HER does not work.

  1. Nancy got her new job when she met Mrs. Nice, WHO/WHOM she met in an Internet chat room.
  2. "She met 'her' in an Internet chat room" makes sense.  "She met 'she' in an Internet chat room" does not work.  Thus, WHOM should be used, since the sentence works with only the word HER.
  3. Nancy got her new job when she met Mrs. Nice, whom she met in an Internet chat room.

 

The substitution method described above also works when done with THEY and THEM. If the sentence works with THEY substituted in it, then use WHO.  If the sentence works with THEM substituted in it, then use WHOM.

Example 3:

  1. The Persians, WHO/WHOM ruled an empire from Spain to East Asia, and from North Asia to South Asia, and to North Africa, eventually reduced down to what is now called Iran.
  2. "They ruled an empire from...." works.  "Them ruled an empire from....." does not work. 
  3. Thus "The Persians, who ruled an empire from Spain......is now called Iran" would be used.

 

What To Do For Who Or Whom Usage Selection

The substitution method described above in the earlier above section also works when when trying to decide if you should use WHOEVER, or WHOMEVER.  The same method described at the top would be used by which HE/SHE or HIM/HER is substituted as a test.  If the sentence makes sense with the words of either HE or SHE, then the answer is to use WHOEVER.  If the sentence makes sense only with the substitution of HIM or HER, then the answer is to use WHOMEVER.

  1. Mentally start your sentence with WHOEVER/WHOMEVER.
  2. Then mentally replace the WHOEVER/WHOMEVER with the appropriate word of either HE/SHE or HIM/HER.
  3. Determine which works for the sentence and use it.  If the sentence makes sense with the words of either HE or SHE, then the answer is to use WHO.  If the sentence makes sense only with the substitution of HIM or HER, then the answer is to use WHOM.

Example 4:

  1. WHOEVER/WHOMEVER raises her hand first, gets the red balloon.
  2. "'She' raises her hand first, gets the red balloon" makes sense.  "'Her' raises her hand first, gets the red balloon" does not work.   
  3. Thus "Whoever raises her hand first, gets the red balloon" would be used.

 

Example 5:

  1. WHOEVER/WHOMEVER reaches the flag first, wins the race!
  2. "'He' reaches the flag first, wins the race" makes sense.  "'Him' reaches the flag first, wins the race" does not work.   
  3. Thus "Whoever reaches the flag first, wins the race" would be used.

 

 

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If you found this article or any Tech Notes article useful, then consider making a contribution as a simple thanks.  Any amount can be given; even just one dollar ($1).  The Paypal contribution button is safe and does not require you to have a Paypal account to make a contribution to Tech Notes

Consider submitting an article of your own to Tech Notes.  I will create a sub-category for your article if needed.  Guest articles are welcome!

 

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Subcategories

Slang is a category that explores technical aspects of slang terms and phrases, confusions involving slang words and phrases, and in general any technical aspects of a slang word or phrase or it's relationship to the language as a whole. 

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